Personal Connection Defines Charitable Giving in British Columbia

Three-in-ten residents have recently donated to health and health care-related organizations.

Vancouver, BC – British Columbians are more likely to make a financial donation to charities that they have established a personal connection with, according to the 2017 Charitable Giving Report, released by Insights West.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, more than half of British Columbians (56%) say an event in their personal life had an influence on the last time they made a financial donation to a charity.

Half of residents (50%) say a personal request from someone they know influenced their decision to donate, while 45% sponsored someone they know in a fundraising event.

“By far, a personal connection is the biggest motivating factor for British Columbians to financially assist a charity,” says Steve Mossop, President of Insights West. “Advertisements or direct pleas from charities do not carry the same influence.”

There is a significant change in the perception of charitable organizations in the province. Since 2012, the proportion of British Columbians who believe charities “waste too much money on administration fees” has dropped from 83% to 72%. In addition, the notion of charities “making poor use of their funding dollars” is also down markedly, from 63% in 2012 to 50% this year.

When asked about their most recent donation, three-in-ten British Columbians (31%) say they assisted a non-profit organization related to health care—such as a hospital foundation or a charity that fights a specific disease. Fewer residents say their last donation was related to social issues (10%), international aid (9%), pet and animal welfare (4%), religion (4%) or environmental conservation and protection (3%).

About this Release:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 9 to May 18, 2017, among 1,255 adult residents of British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age and gender in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.8 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

For the full 2017 Charitable Giving Report click here.

For further information, please contact:

Steve Mossop
President, Insights West
778-379-1140
stevemossop@insightswest.com